New OR Suites Aim at Patient-Centric Design

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An operating suite is arguably the most important room in healthcare—and one of the most dangerous.  A new move in the medical industry aims to redesign ORs with patient and surgical team safety in mind. Concerned about outcomes, most patients do not give a lot of thought to what happens in the OR once they … Continued

USC to Pay $1.1 Billion to Victims of George Tyndall

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Finally acknowledging that hundreds of college students were abused by a school gynecologist, the University of Southern California will pay three settlements to victims totaling $1.1 billion. For 27 years, Dr. George Tyndall worked at the USC student health center as a gynecologist. During that time, Dr. Tyndall used his workplace to sexually prey on … Continued

Study Supports Nintendo Wii for Balance Assist with Cerebral Palsy Patients

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Adding to earlier research, a new study suggests balance therapy using Nintendo Wii can be helpful to patients with cerebral palsy. Wii is a home video game console produced by Nintendo and introduced around 2006.  The device includes a wireless controller with motion sensors.  The popular game was marketed for fun and to promote movement … Continued

Physicians May Mistake Hypertension for Menopause

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Healthcare providers who mistake symptoms of high blood pressure as menopause-induced discomfort could increase the risk of serious heart disease in their patients. A lack of hypertension, stroke, and cardiovascular studies focused on symptoms and treatment of women means that research designed for men is too often applied to women. As well, physicians who treat … Continued

Treatment for Heart Disease in Women Less Aggressive—and Less Successful

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Although the leading cause of death of women and men is heart disease, a large, recent study suggests women are far less likely to undergo a potentially life-saving procedure than men. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention about 18.2 million adults over the age of 20 have coronary heart disease (CAD) in … Continued

HHS Issues Fraud Alert for Pharma Companies Payola to Physicians

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The US Congress passed anti-kickback laws in 1972 to protect patients from unscrupulous healthcare providers and Pharma companies who exchange cash and goodies to promote drugs and devices. Apparently, some people did not get the memo.  While luxury vacations and payola to physicians from the medical industry leveled off after enactment of laws against the … Continued

Head injury more Common in College Football Practices than in a Game

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As research continues to explore the relationship between collision sports and brain injury, a new study suggests college football players suffer more concussions during practices than in actual games.  Published in the Journal JAMA Neurology, the study reviewed data from collegiate football programs enrolled in the Concussion Assessment, Research, and Education (CARE) Consortium. Data was … Continued

Fight Against COVID May Lead to more Drug-Resistant Germs

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The urgent worldwide battle against COVID-19 may have allowed dangerous drug-resistant germs to gain a greater foothold in human populations and care facilities. Hospitals and nursing homes are home to different forms of multi-drug resistant germs—bacteria, fungus, and viruses. According to STAT, there are 2.8 million multi-drug resistant infections (formerly called “superbugs”) in the US … Continued

Study Revisits Relationship between Some Drugs and Birth Defects

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Recent studies published in the BMJ suggest that children of pregnant mothers who were prescribed opioids or antibiotics during pregnancy do not have a higher risk of suffering major birth defects. In recent years, studies have suggested babies who were exposed in utero to drugs prescribed for their mothers, like opioids or antibiotics, could lead … Continued

Research suggests Increased Risk for Patients Prescribed Multiple Thinners

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Patients routinely treated with multiple blood thinners may have higher risk of bleeding events without a corresponding reduction in risk of blood clots. Blood thinners are a type of medication used to prevent or deter the formation of blood clots. Anticoagulants are one type of blood thinner that work by thinning the blood to reduce … Continued