New Guidelines for treating C. diff in Hospital Settings

Published on

New treatment guidelines may reduce and deter the sometime serious impacts of infection with Clostridoides difficile (C. diff). A bacterium that causes inflammation of the colon (colitis) and severe diarrhea, C. diff can be serious at any age.  It more often impacts patients on antibiotic treatment, those who are immune compromised, individuals who have had … Continued

OB Patients at Risk for Wrong Patient Orders

Published on

A recent study suggests new moms and their babies may be at higher risk for receiving medical care intended for another patient. Electronic health records provide efficiencies, but also have challenges—especially in busy surgical settings like an emergency department or obstetric unit.  New research published in Obstetrics and Gynecology found that erroneous medical orders are … Continued

Distraction during Surgical Counts Contributes to Retained Surgical Objects

Published on

A recent study points to distraction as a contributing factor behind unintended retention of foreign objects (URFOs). Consider this – a patient undergoes surgery which is uneventful and helpful.  One year later, increasing pain sends the patient back to their healthcare provider.  Ultimately, imaging studies reveal a surgical sponge entombed within the pelvis of the … Continued

Reducing Pregnancy Complications with Home Health Nurses

Published on

To reduce rates of maternal and infant mortality, New Jersey is initiating voluntary wellness checks for families with newborn children. Despite its wealth, the US health system ranks last in the industrialized world for its attention to maternal and infant death. Overall, approximately 18 women die per 100,000 pregnancies. In some areas of the US … Continued

US Ranks Last in Health Care in Recent Survey of Higher Income Countries (Again)

Published on

Among 10 equivalent developed countries, a recent survey again rated the United States health system last when measured across different domains of healthcare service. The COVID pandemic revealed gaps and strengths in healthcare systems around the world with regard to infection control, treatment, and public health resilience. The Commonwealth Fund is a foundation that supports … Continued

How FDA approval of e-cigarettes can benefit Maryland schools

Published on

The Daily Record Philip Federico and D. Bruce Poole December 2, 2021 Last month the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the first time authorized the marketing of three e-cigarette products, marking the first set of “electronic nicotine delivery system” products to be authorized through its pathway for new tobacco devices. While this authorization … Continued

Telehealth Update: Telemedicine May Help Reduce ED Visits

Published on

Telemedicine continues to make inroads into the practice of medicine.  A new study suggests telehealth may provide needed care to consumers while reducing demand on emergency departments. Though in use prior to the COVID pandemic, telehealth vaulted to the forefront of the practice of medicine as social distancing became a health practice due to contagion. … Continued

OB/GYN Sentenced to 59 Years in Prison for Unnecessary Surgery and Health Fraud

Published on

A 71-year-old Virginia physician will see his life out in prison after conviction on health care fraud and other charges. In November 2019, Javaid Perwaiz was named in a criminal complaint involving health care fraud and arrested the same day.  In 2020, Dr. Perwaiz was convicted by a jury on 51 counts of fraud and … Continued

Does a High MIPS Score Mean Better Surgical Outcomes? Not so Much

Published on

More profit to physicians for higher quality medical care seems like a good incentive. A new research study of the Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) provides only limited support for the validity of the program. Over time, the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS) have developed and tinkered with quality improvement programs to assist … Continued